The D-Link DNS-323 network attached storage, what a fantastic device. With it’s ultra 500 Mhz ARM processor, 64 MB of memory, Gigabit Ethernet controller, and two SATA 2 3.5″ drive bays all in a little box about the size of a 360 power supply (that ugly brick) *kawaii!!*.

Any who. With a little tweaking, this little box can do so much more than just act as a: samba, ftp, iTunes, uPnP Audio/Video Server, and DHCP server. With a little effort you can go ahead and install yourself a copy of Debian on it and do… well… anything on it. But for those who aren’t as ambitious to void their warranty, you can still use a huge collection of ‘fun_plug’ programs instead.

I’m currently working with the chroot method of installing Debian, if I can avoid flashing a custom firmware and potentially having to install a serial port, both of which void your warranty, I’ll be thrilled.

I have Debian Lenny, Apache 2, and PHP5 currently installed. I’m just working on disabling a few things to get all of the above to work smoothly together.

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6.

60Hz

Oh yes, 60Hz, my favorite vertical refresh rate, but why I wonder?

Well for starters it’s the best and easiest way to get a headache. I have a 52 inch Sharp LCD TV (LC52D64U) and it’s max refresh rate at 1920×1080 is 60Hz, which makes it fantastic to watch while playing anything high definition. Since I use it as a monitor, and the only way it looks decent is at 1080p, I’m currently stuck at 60Hz.

So I suppose it’s time to buy another TV… or an actual monitor for the mean time.

QQ

B.

Bulk Add IP Addresses

I do a lot of local development with Internet Information Services and either ColdFusion, PHP or ASP.net and for the longest time I would actually run the websites on separate ports on 127.0.0.1.

Unfortunately running multiple websites on various other ports causes some issues like:

  • Port conflicts with other programs
  • Remembering which port is used for what website
  • Causes problems with some websites that look for port 80
  • Doesn’t really work with SSL (port 443)

So what I started doing was running my websites on separate private IP addresses which are local to my machine only, and this worked GREAT! I could load up websitexyz, bind it to IP 1.1.1.10, setup SSL to work on port 443 for 1.1.1.10 and I would go about my business.

The only downside was when I would run out of IP addresses, because I would only add about 5 to 10 IPs at a time to my local loopback adapter. It is a bit of a pain in the butt to add a bunch of IP addresses in Windows, so it would take me a bit of time to do this everytime I needed more IPs.

That was until I ran into a small batch script which can add as many IP addresses as I want in a range.

Here’s the code:

FOR /L %A IN (41,1,100) DO netsh interface ipv4 add address “ColdFusion-IIS” 1.1.1.%A 255.255.255.0

Simply copy that into either a command prompt or a .bat file and run it to add as many IP addresses in a range that you want.

Here’s the break down of the script:

FOR /L %A IN (START,INCREMENT,END) DO netsh interface ipv4 add address “INTERFACE_NAME” IPMASK SUBNET

If we take a look at my script above we see that

  • START = 41
  • INCREMENT = 1
  • END = 100
  • INTERFACE_NAME = ColdFusion-IIS
  • IPMASK = 1.1.1.%A
  • SUBNET = 255.255.255.0

What this basically equates to is adding 1.1.1.41 to 1.1.1.100 to my network adapter called ColdFusion-IIS.
It is a super handy script and saved me a bunch of time, I would recommend it 10/10 for local development.