The D-Link DNS-323 network attached storage, what a fantastic device. With it’s ultra 500 Mhz ARM processor, 64 MB of memory, Gigabit Ethernet controller, and two SATA 2 3.5″ drive bays all in a little box about the size of a 360 power supply (that ugly brick) *kawaii!!*.

Any who. With a little tweaking, this little box can do so much more than just act as a: samba, ftp, iTunes, uPnP Audio/Video Server, and DHCP server. With a little effort you can go ahead and install yourself a copy of Debian on it and do… well… anything on it. But for those who aren’t as ambitious to void their warranty, you can still use a huge collection of ‘fun_plug’ programs instead.

I’m currently working with the chroot method of installing Debian, if I can avoid flashing a custom firmware and potentially having to install a serial port, both of which void your warranty, I’ll be thrilled.

I have Debian Lenny, Apache 2, and PHP5 currently installed. I’m just working on disabling a few things to get all of the above to work smoothly together.

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B.

Bulk Add IP Addresses

I do a lot of local development with Internet Information Services and either ColdFusion, PHP or ASP.net and for the longest time I would actually run the websites on separate ports on 127.0.0.1.

Unfortunately running multiple websites on various other ports causes some issues like:

  • Port conflicts with other programs
  • Remembering which port is used for what website
  • Causes problems with some websites that look for port 80
  • Doesn’t really work with SSL (port 443)

So what I started doing was running my websites on separate private IP addresses which are local to my machine only, and this worked GREAT! I could load up websitexyz, bind it to IP 1.1.1.10, setup SSL to work on port 443 for 1.1.1.10 and I would go about my business.

The only downside was when I would run out of IP addresses, because I would only add about 5 to 10 IPs at a time to my local loopback adapter. It is a bit of a pain in the butt to add a bunch of IP addresses in Windows, so it would take me a bit of time to do this everytime I needed more IPs.

That was until I ran into a small batch script which can add as many IP addresses as I want in a range.

Here’s the code:

FOR /L %A IN (41,1,100) DO netsh interface ipv4 add address “ColdFusion-IIS” 1.1.1.%A 255.255.255.0

Simply copy that into either a command prompt or a .bat file and run it to add as many IP addresses in a range that you want.

Here’s the break down of the script:

FOR /L %A IN (START,INCREMENT,END) DO netsh interface ipv4 add address “INTERFACE_NAME” IPMASK SUBNET

If we take a look at my script above we see that

  • START = 41
  • INCREMENT = 1
  • END = 100
  • INTERFACE_NAME = ColdFusion-IIS
  • IPMASK = 1.1.1.%A
  • SUBNET = 255.255.255.0

What this basically equates to is adding 1.1.1.41 to 1.1.1.100 to my network adapter called ColdFusion-IIS.
It is a super handy script and saved me a bunch of time, I would recommend it 10/10 for local development.
m.

mobile radio

So I finally figured out how to stream radio to my phone. More specifically 1.FM radio. The problem came with the fact that 1.FM uses MMS to stream their radio which would work on most non-java smartphones. Unfortunately I have a u740 Java phone and so it doesn’t work.

So after about 6 months of sporatic work, I finally figured it out. I had to use VLC as a encoder to tranform the MMS stream to a mp4-latm RTP stream. After that, then use Darwin Streaming Server to take the RTP stream from VLC and broadcast it using the RTSP protocol.

So yea, now I can rock away and tell my cell company to take that 7.00/month radio package and shove it.